Jonathon Miller

Jonathon Miller’s photographic series Concrete (2020) suggests a  yearning for the beauty of natural forms against the increasing  mechanisation of life, the idealisation of everything “organic”, everything  that has grown or taken form “naturally” in opposition to the “artificial” and  the “mechanical”. The viewer is presented with images of a stark urban  industrial landscape, encapsulating a “disenchanted” view of nature as so  much dead stuff, as mere raw material for the processes of industrial  production. 

Jonathon Miller’s exploration of a nostalgia for a progressively  disappearing nature, replaced with concrete landscapes, attempts to  visually represent the philosopher Georg Lukacs’ analysis of the Romantic  idealisation of nature as an expression of “the feeling that social  institutions (reification) strip human beings of there “humanity” and that  the more culture and civilisation (i.e. capitalism and reification) take  possession of us the less humanity we possess. The idea of “Nature”  comes to exist historically in the human imagination as a symbol of the  “organic” – somehow embodying real, life-affirming human values in  opposition to a disenchanted world dominated by “the ‘ordered’,  calculable, formal and abstract character” of capitalist industrialism and  “the artificial structures of human civilisation.” Nature becomes the  sanctuary of alternative ideals – “that aspect of humanity that has  remained natural, or atleast tends, or longs to become natural again:  humanity liberated from the false mechanising forms of a dehumanised  and reified society.” (Georg Lukacs) 

Jonathon Miller’s exploration of a nostalgia for a progressively  disappearing nature, replaced with concrete landscapes, attempts to  visually represent the philosopher Georg Lukacs’ analysis of the Romantic  idealisation of nature as an expression of “the feeling that social  institutions (reification) strip human beings of there “humanity” and that  the more culture and civilisation (i.e. capitalism and reification) take  possession of us the less humanity we possess. The idea of “Nature”  comes to exist historically in the human imagination as a symbol of the  “organic” – somehow embodying real, life-affirming human values in  opposition to a disenchanted world dominated by “the ‘ordered’,  calculable, formal and abstract character” of capitalist industrialism and  “the artificial structures of human civilisation.” Nature becomes the  sanctuary of alternative ideals – “that aspect of humanity that has  remained natural, or atleast tends, or longs to become natural again:  humanity liberated from the false mechanising forms of a dehumanised  and reified society.” (Georg Lukacs) 

www.instagram.com/jonathon_miller1998

Steve Harvey - Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California. USA

November 30, 2020

Michael Nirenberg, Indiana, USA

November 30, 2020

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